Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Nobody's home

July 6, 2011
Took a break from fishing and took the girls hiking up a mountain with a fire tower on it.  The deer flies were pretty annoying despite the heavy dose of repellent.  Once we were up on the fire tower the strong winds made for a very pleasant candy bar and water snack and then back down to the trail head.  We did cross a nice looking brook but I didn't have the heart to ask the girls to wait there as "bug bait" while I checked to see if anyone was home.  Here are some views from the fire tower.
View towards home base
One of dozen's of Mud Lakes in the area.  The local guides would name the ponds Mud Lake to deter other guides from fishing them

July 7, 2011
I got up early again to more carefully explore two brooks I had visited on Monday.  Today, I would drive up some old logging roads further into the mountains to see if these brooks had some interesting water with some local residents at home.
The first brook had some interesting looking water a ways up so I looked for a spot to pull the truck off the single lane dirt logging road.  This brook had a lot of waist high grass and brush along the bank suggesting that during spring the brook is considerably wider.  I was soaking wet within a few minutes from trudging through the damp grass but I did find an interesting riffle/bend/pool combination.  Unfortunately nobody was home.  This was the case with several other promising spots I found along this brook.
Nobody's home ???
Undaunted, I packed it in and headed to the second brook.  Again I worked my way up a single lane dirt logging road and found a pull-off and headed into the forest.  This stream had a nice canopy of hemlocks and hardwoods but was considerably smaller.  The bomber was attacked in very pool I put it in but I couldn't hook a thing to have a look.  After some careful drifting I did manage to bring a few fish to hand unfortunately they were all fat head minnows.  This has been the tale of many too brooks and ponds in the A-dacks that once held brook trout where the careless release of bait fish has decimated the native brook trout population.

July 8, 2011
Best day out of the entire week - details to follow

6 comments:

  1. Always sad to hear of the decrease of wild trout populations...but am looking forward to hearing about July 8th!

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  2. That's a shame that the brook trout were nowhere to be found. Hopefully they bounce back and make a full and speedy recovery.

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  3. George

    Unfortunately once the bait fish take over the whole stream needs to be treated with biocide and then stocked fish introduced. I've been talking with the fisheries biologist for the region, we'll see if anything happens

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  4. Thanks for the info Mark. I had no idea this is how a "stream revival" works. Thanks for the info

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  5. For those interested in the brook trout restoration program in NY use the following link

    http://www.easternbrooktrout.org/docs/EBTJV_NewYork_CS.pdf

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  6. It's a shame.
    One of the best wild brook trout fisheries in the US, the Rapid in Maine, is suffering from some stupid act of illegal stocking of smallies in the system.

    Sorry Mark for the rant.
    Looking forward to your next post.

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