Saturday, February 22, 2014

Stone flies in the snow

Today, we had a bit of a thaw in CT.  By mid afternoon the temperature was approaching 55F, a reading we haven't seen in a long while.  I thought this afternoon might be my best opportunities to find a few brook trout willing to chasing down a dry fly. I decided to leave the snowshoes in the car even though there was still a fair amount of snow on the ground.  I started off with the pinkie and had a few tugs but nothing to hand.

A sunny, warm mid winter afternoon in New England, priceless!

As the afternoon warmed, I put on an Adam's parachute and had one small brook trout swipe at the dry but I could not coax it to come back.  While fishing the pinkie, I did have one brook trout swipe at it as I was lifting from a deep run.  I put a peacock caddis dry on and sent it on it's way and managed two small brookies right off.  As the afternoon continued to warm, stone flies were evident in the air and in the snow.

February's first fish on a dry

I continued to fish the dry most of the afternoon but I did not entice any more trout to take the dry fly.  I ended up fishing the pinkie and had a couple brief hookups.



It was a beautiful sunny warm day to be out and take pictures and do a little dry fly fishing.  By the time I got back to the car, my feet were pretty wet but the sun was warm on the back.  I can't think of a better way to spend a mid winter afternoon.




16 comments:

  1. Mark
    I wish I had been there with you my 7 1/2 ft. 3 wt.Tempt Redington and matching 2/3 wt. Drift reel. The Adams is one of my favorites. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thanks Bill, if you are ever up in this part of the country we will have to show you what fishing in New England is all about. Lots of folks up this way are sick of the snow but I enjoy it.

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  2. Nice work on the brookie water. I took a tour of northern PA today, but nearly all the streams were caked with ice despite the temperature warming into the 40s. With all the snow remaining, there is some concern about flood damage if the melt is too fast.

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    1. Walt - we've been hoping for a gentle thawing up here too. Despite the warm temps there is still plenty of snow on the ground and the forecast looks like we will be back in the cold soon. As longs as we don't get a few days of warm rain, we should get a steady release of the water tied up in the snow pack come spring

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  3. Love the Adams. In fact, it is the name of the road I live on. Looks like fun.

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    1. Matt - the Adams is like an amex card, I never leave home without it. I really like Fran Better's variation that uses ground hog guard hairs for the tail and muskrat fur for dubbing.

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  4. Those are pretty little guys. It's great to get fish on dries when the water is cooled off from melt water!

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    1. RLM - this time of year on warm afternoons, the early black stones come out and brookies can be coaxed to the surface.

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  5. The little stream looks beautiful in the winter sunshine Mark, thanks for sharing.

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    1. Brian - thanks, I've always enjoyed sights and sounds of a small stream in late winter/early spring when the days are warming. It just gives you the sense that things are coming alive again.

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  6. Hey buddy nice brookies, and on the dry.
    Still quite a bit of snow, but the water is brilliant.

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    1. Alan - thanks, with all the snow melt the brook was high but also crystal clear. The snow pack was about 12-15 inches and not too bad to get around in

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  7. Nice going Mark!! Pretty photos of the fish and surrounding scenery!

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    1. Pete - thanks, it was nice to get outside and enjoy the warm air

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  8. Looks like a fun outing! That brookie, I could be wrong... but I think he looks like he's thinking: "Where is spring!" :)
    Will

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