Saturday, March 29, 2014

The first wildflowers of spring

With gray skies and the water a chilly 42F, the fishing on the Farmington River was pretty slow but Pete and I managed a handful on wooley buggers with sink tip lines.  While walking to the first stop we fished I noticed a bunch of snow drops.  While these are not true wildflowers (they are transplants from Europe), they are nevertheless the first flowers I've seen growing in the wild this spring.  The earth is starting to awake from a long, cold winter

14 comments:

  1. No such sights in these parts yet, but soon I hope.

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  2. A great streamside sight. once these melting runoff levels die-down.. we should be seeing trout lillys alongside our favorite trout streams. I've noticed stream grasses getting greener, but i havent noticed any flowers yet. Great shot

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    1. SW - thanks, I was a bit surprise to see anything blooming but they were a little reminder that warmer days are ahead

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  3. It was definitely a long cold winter...our first snow drops came into bloom a few days ago. It shouldnt be long now before the memories of this winter are wiped clean and replaced with new ones of standing in a stream waving a stick and bringing beautiful trout to hand.

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  4. Mark: It was good to get out and fish with you. Yes it was a little slow, but we avoided the skunk, was not crowded, and no pesky insects! A good day!

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    1. Pete - yes it was good to get out and breathe some fresh air!

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  5. Good to see spring is finally on its way in your neck of the woods!

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    1. Brian - thanks, things are starting to turn

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  6. What are the native spring plants? I do hope the Snowdrops have not had a negative impact on your native plants...

    RR

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  7. Rod the native wildflowers are various species of violets, anemones, and trillium. We won't see these for a while yet. The ornamental flowers such as daffodils, crocus, and snowdrops will often grow in the woodlands and along roadsides, their bulbs probably spread by squirrels. I don't think they are negatively impacting the wild, native species though.

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  8. Mark
    Beautiful wild flowers; Question about the sink tip line---I will be fishing this line for the first time on our local lake soon for Spotted Bass deep. This lake is over 300 ft. in places. I will be using the bugger, is there anything one needs to know other than sinking fast about this line??? Thanks for sharing

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  9. Bill, keep your leader short, so the line will get the fly down. You can "count" the line down so that once you find fish you will know how long to let the line sink before the retrieve. Be careful casting, sinking lines are heavy and you don't want hit yourself in the back or neck with the fly.

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