Friday, June 20, 2014

A Thursday afternoon

Yesterday after work I headed to the Farmington River to fish for the evening.  When I arrived there were a few sulfurs coming off but nothing consistent.  I couldn't see any fish rising in the section of pocket water I had chosen to fish so I opted to nymph.  A half dozen browns and rainbows were brought to hand on the bead head pheasant tail soft hackle (#16), a #12 gray super simple, and a #18 brown super simple.  I hung around until 8 PM but things were pretty quiet.



I thought it would be best to relocate to a spot that I like to fish at sunset when the sulfurs are out.  The new location was pretty vacant with the exception of a familiar face.  I have shared this spot with this gentleman on several occasions.  I don't even known his name but  it's fun to fish  this spot with him because he is very observant and quickly picks up on what is going on which is a big asset in this particular spot.  After saying hello and catching up with each other, he mentioned that he had seen some isonychia around and that the fish were taking them.  He was spot on!  The isonychia comparadun fooled a couple of  browns and a rainbow when it was put in the right location with a decent drift.  He managed a few as well.



As the daylight faded, we said our good byes and he headed home.  I chose to stay and see what would happen at the close of the day.  Fish were rising steady but I couldn't see what they were taking.  My usual go to fly in this spot is the "Usual" but it was going unnoticed.  After struggling for quite a while to get an size18 rusty spinner tied on in the poor light, I finally succeeded and picked up one brown before things settled down for the evening and I headed home having enjoyed another good evening on the Farmington. 

9 comments:

  1. That sounds awesome. What's a super simple? Glad you got to get out and enjoy time on the H2O!

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    1. Hibernation - the super simple is a simple weighted nymph tied with a tungsten bead, hot orange thread, and gray Haretron dubbing or a medium brown squirrel dubbing. I split the thread and put the dubbing in the formed loop, wind the body rough, use small copper wire for a rib and finish it off with a small orange hot spot with the thread behind the bead. Check out Rich Strolis' site for a tying video

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    2. FYI everyone - I just added a link to Rich Strolis' super simple over in the fly box to the right for those interested in tying it.

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  2. Mark
    Nice browns fishing on my favorite water up that way; I Goggled the isonychia comparadun and see that it looks similar to the Adams. This post proves why it is essential to match the hatch on those days when one is trying to select the right pattern. I hope I get to come that way one day and fish this great tailrace. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - over on the right side of this blog is the fly box. I've put links there to a picture and recipe for all the flies that I have put a post up on. If you ever have a question about what the fly looks like or what materials are used you can find them over there on the right panel.

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  3. That is a good night Mark!!! Have to get out soon!!!

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  4. Sulphurs at dusk.....sounds good.
    That rainbow is striking.

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    1. Alan - one of my favorite times to fish. We will have to "stay late" one night while the sulfurs are still going and I will show you why Fran Betters Usual was made! Genius!

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