Thursday, July 10, 2014

Adirondacks - Part II

Last week I also explored another stream that I discovered last fall.  This brook is less than 2 miles from brook described in the previous post (Adirondacks - Part I) but runs through an adjacent valley leading eventually into the same larger river system.  Even though these two streams run very close to one another the geology and water chemistry of these two streams are very different from one another as you can see from some of the pictures that follow.  I will let the pictures speak for me...



The stream has several pools that are quite deep and yet you can easily see the bottom as can be seen in the picture below.  For reference, the deepest part of this pool (dead center) is over 3' deep.  In addition to the clarity of the water, the rocks and gravel in this stream have an orange color to them.  I think both of these factors have an effect on the coloration of the trout that inhabit this stream.

One of many deep, clear, pools

 The coloration of the brook trout reside in this stream are much lighter across the back and flanks with a hint of orange in the tail fin relative to the tannin stained stream close by.  While most of the fish were small, they made up for their size in strength and beauty.


The section I was fishing had a pretty steep gradient and there was a strong current but even here there are places for fish to hide.  I threw the Royal Wulff under the overhanging boulder pictured below and out from the shadow came another gorgeous brook trout.  I had fun trying to pry it loose from his lair without sending him down over the next plunge.

Here you can see the orange color of the granite this stream runs over

The color of the stream bed is reflected in the tail of this brook trout
One the last cast of the afternoon, I managed to find one of the larger residents.  After a quick picture I called it a night with plans to come back and explore some more water upstream.


A lovely stream running through a Hemlock forest


A few days later, I revisited this lovely stream.  Some strong thunderstorms had moved through the area the day before and the water level was up quite a bit.  It was hard to find some quite water where the fish could hold and I could get a fly to them but I did find a few places.


Another deep plunge, streamers might have been a better option this day



The view looking downstream. Plunge after plunge stepping down the mountain


I have to visit this stream again when the water levels are down a bit more
On the way home, I crossed the head waters of the of the stream described in Part I.  This upstream section can get quite low in the summer but the new push of water made this section come alive so I decided to fish the Wulff in a nice run and saw a fish slash at the fly in a seam between to riffles.  The second drift sealed the deal and brought the best fish of the day to hand but it didn't want to hang around for a quick picture.  The rest of the stream was pretty dead so I called it a day and headed home.

14 comments:

  1. What a great spot - glad you were able to explore the stream, and enjoy meeting the residents!
    Will

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  2. Mark
    I thought the stream you fished in part 1 was fantastic, but this one is even better to fish. What amazes me about all the streams is accessibility one has to the pools. Is there a part 3 to this adventure?
    Excellent post with some amazing images!!

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    1. thanks Bill - sorry just a two stream adventure last week

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  3. It's interesting to see how the geography and chemistry of these two close streams make a difference in the appearance of the trout. Love that photo of the brookie tail blending in with the streambed.

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    1. Walt - I thought it was very interesting as well. Alan and I have had this conversation a couple times and we have both noticed that darker, tannin stain streams have darker trout and lighter streams lighter colored ones.

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  4. Simply stunning. How magical and stunning. Miraculous creations Brook Trout are.

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    1. Atlas - I never get tired of holding wild brook trout, they remind me that God has an amazing palate of colors to paint the world with!

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  5. Wow, that pool in the second picture looks so clear, beautiful.

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    1. LQN - if there is one thing about this stream that strikes me most it's how crystal clear the water is!

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  6. Looks like a good adventure.

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  7. Love the blog. Looking to explore the Adirondacks myself, if I could ever find the time. Moved to Glens Falls last year and have been looking to do some exploring. Thanks for the motivation!

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    1. Lots of water up there to explore for sure, enjoy!

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