Saturday, January 31, 2015

Euro nymphing - Part 1.

It's the season for tying around here since the cold and snow has kept me off the streams.  I thought a couple of posts on European style nymphing would be of interest so I will be showing you some of the flies and setup I have been using.  I refer to this style of nymphing as "European" rather than the more descriptive terms of Czech , Spanish, or French.  Not being one to get caught up in proper names, European is probably a better term for the hybrid technique I use anyway.  This past year I've caught more, and larger trout using this basically simple technique, which is new to me since I really enjoy fishing dry flies.

European nymphing for me is really no more that "tight line" nymphing that enables me to easily feel, see, and react to a fish taking the fly.  The basic leader setup I use is shown in the diagram below. Sometimes I use a tippet ring, but if I need to rebuild the leader and tippet section on the stream, I will use a triple surgeon's knot and tie the dropper off the tag end.  I like to use a bicolor section of fluorescent mono as a "sighter" which helps me  see where the leader is and follow its movement through the drift.

My basic leader setup
 This technique uses weighted flies to get them down to the fish quickly. Being a minimalist to the core, I really like the fact that I can catch fish year round on the same basic set of flies that fit neatly into a slim fly box. I typically fish a two fly rig with a heavily weighted "anchor" fly as the point fly and a smaller nymph as the dropper which is representative of whatever nymphs are in the water at that particular time of the year.  Over the next couple posts I will show you how I weight the anchor flies and provide recipes and tips for fishing some of my favorites from the box below.   I also want to acknowledge Rich Strolis of Catching Shadows who who sent me a set of his top flies that helped me see the actual flies and improve my ability to effectively tie of them.  Rich has some very informative tying videos up at his vimeo channel that are linked in the fly box over to the right of the blog.

Everything in one neat little box 

8 comments:

  1. Those wormy looking things caught my eye, is that lie a combo of a san juan and a latex worm?

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  2. RML - The ones one the lower rower (4 across) are vladi worms (latex) and the ones above are pink san jaun style worms (pinkie that we've been fishing with a tungsten bead).

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    1. ah! I thought I might just be seeing things.

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    2. I've caught a lot of brook trout on small streams on the pink san juan but I've only caught one fish on the vladi worm ever. I keep it in the box because it is heavy and sometimes I use it for the weight alone.

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  3. Mark
    Some really good info here not only for Euro nymphing, but the leader set-up as well, I am a big fan of the tippet ring, so useful and effective. I started Euro nymphing sometime back after reading some of your first post on the technique. I haven't got as good as you but I am landing trout with the tight line method. I will continue the process this coming season. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - Glad to hear you are experimenting with the technique and having some success!

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  4. Very interesting and informative. You have peaked my interest for sure sir! Thank you for posting, may I ask is there a particular brand of the bicolor flouro that you recommend?

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    1. Atlas - I pick up a lot of materials from wflies.com. They have a couple of types of indicators (http://wflies.com/Tippets.html). Some people like the slinkies which are very sensitive but the ones I've made get twisted and kinked a lot so I prefer the indicator straight.

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