Sunday, March 1, 2015

Adirondack Pond fly

A couple months ago, I had the pleasure of talking with Jim Abbott who is Adirondack guide.  Jim has a lot of experience fishing the Adirondack ponds for brook trout.  He brought along some pictures of some very impressive brook trout.  Hopefully we will have the chance to fish together.  This type of fishing requires a light weight, pack-able canoe and a level sinking line for trolling the flies.  The flies are lightly bounced off the bottom.  He showed me one of these flies which I took home and studied how to construct.  It appears to be a leech imitation with the red buck tail and a thick peacock herl body. I tried to find a name for this fly but could not.  If anyone is familiar with this fly and it's name please chime in on the comments section.

From handling the fly I could tell it is not weighted so I needed to solve how to build up the bulk of the body.  The solution I came up with was to use the buck tail tips to build up a tapered under body.

Underbody built up with the tips of the bucktail
Once the under body is built up, gold wire is added to rib the fly and 6 strands of peacock herl are tied in. A little trick I learned for reinforcing peacock herl bodies is the take thread and wrap it once around the herl strands counter clockwise.  Then wrap the herl clockwise around the shank of the hook.  This has the effect of twisting the thread and the herl together to give a more robust herl body. After the body is formed a black saddle is tied in at the head and palmered to the rear of the fly and then tied down with the wire which is wrapped over the hackle from rear to the hook eye to lock the hackle down.

The finished fly
I am going to tie a down sized version of this fly for small streams.  When things thaw out I will let you know how it works out.  Here are the materials I used in this fly:

Mustad R75-79580 size 8
Uni 6/0 black thread
small gold UTC ultrawire rib
dyed red buck tail
peacock herl (5-7 strands)
black saddle hackle

14 comments:

  1. Sort of a woolly worm with a difference. Very cool looking. I hope you get a chance to use that, still water brookies have always intrigued me.

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    1. RML - yes it does resemble a supersized woolly worm. I've never fished for pond brookies so and I intrigued as well. Hopefully I can get a taste of this style of fishing this spring.

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  2. I agree. It looks like a woolly worm with a long reg tag. Nice fly.

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  3. nice Mark, will have to try it on some ponds this spring.

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    1. LQN - I hear it can really get some attention when trolled from a canoe

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  4. Looks like a killer fly for sure. Nice tie.

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    1. Kiwi - we will find out hopefully

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  5. I have always wanted to fish for pond brookies. This looks like an effective pattern, and I would love to hear how it performs!

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    1. Ri brook trout - I've wanted to do the same but never really knew where to start. Talking with Jim was very helpful

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  6. Mark
    Attractive pattern, when you say weight are you only using the wire weight on the fly or a small shot placed on the tippet? Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - the fly is not weighted with wire under the body and no split shot is used. The level sinking line takes the fly down.

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  7. That's a cool fly which I will also try to tie up. I may weight it with a black nickle or olive bead just to fit "me" but the rest will be as is. It's a beauty! There's a good name for it: the Beauty Bugger :)!
    Will

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    1. Thanks Will! Another name could be the Peacock Bugger or Adirondack Bugger. I am sure other's could chime in here as well with suggested names.

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