Saturday, June 20, 2015

Farmington Friday

Ragged Robin still in bloom along the river
Yesterday afternoon I met with Pete (aka TROUTI) and we fished a couple spots on the Farmington.

When I met Pete he had already taken a handful of fish on a streamer but the afternoon was young.  I nymphed the faster water where I have found fish before and blanked, which really surprised me until Pete took me to school and nymphed the same run only closer to shore and picked up two.  I went back, put a heavier, brighter anchor fly on and worked the pocket water close to shore and brought three nice browns to hand, missed two and the hook pulled out on a third missle that took off for the opposite shore before I could turn it.  Lesson Learned :  after rain check the runs close to shore!

A pocket water brown

We moved to a location close by and Pete took a number of fish in a nice long run while I fished some rapids below him.  On the first cast, I had a brown come off the bottom to tear my bead head pheasant tail dropper right off the rig.  I never had a chance.  I picked up a nice little wild brown in another pocket and then headed up to see how Pete was doing.  The sulfurs were starting to come off and he had seen some fish taking them off the surface.  I waded out and tossed a sulfur parachute and picked off two before Pete headed home and I headed to another spot I wanted to check out.

The third spot has some nice pocket water that fished very well last year during the sulfur hatch. When I arrived everything was quite and no one was around including the fish.  So I moved to where I thought I might find some early evening risers and planed to stick it out until dark to see if the sulfurs starting coming off.

An early evening riser that took the small Adams

A couple guys fishing the water I was interested in so, I worked below them and figured they might not stick around too late.  I managed one brown on a sulfur parachute and worked up to my spot when one of the anglers left.  I found a rock to stand on and to get out of the frigid waist deep water and watch for rising fish.  The sulfurs never did make an appearance but there were a few fish sipping either small olive emergers or spinners.  I managed to pick off one with a #22 Adams parachute. There were a few fish steadily taking something small in the film just beyond my reach.  I thought they might be taking spinners but I didn't have any small rusty spinners in my box so I put on a #22 olive parachute and worked hard to get the fly over where the fish were working.  I managed to lay out a nice cast and get a decent drift and picked off a decent brown to finish off the evening.  At this point I was freezing from being in the cold water and I could barely feel my feet.  Even though darkness was about 30 minutes away, I really needed to warm up.   Who would believe I was driving home on a June night with the heat cranking, sipping some hot coffee!

10 comments:

  1. I would believe it. That's what we were doing on the way back from the Farmi last Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Then you know about the summer shivers!

      Delete
  2. We had a good day Mark!!!! First time in a long time that I really hammered the fish!!! Good to fish with you again!!! The browns were certainly very co operative!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pete - you were certainly putting on a clinic between nymphing and fishing streamers!

      Delete
  3. I would give anything to finish a day that cold right now. It has been hot and humid but without any rain for us in the Smokies. Glad you are having some good fishing up your way!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David - The Farmington river has it's own micro climate in the upper reaches of the river near the dam. On warm summer days temperature differential between the air temp and the water temp sets up a cold fog that hangs over the river. When you go down into the river and the fog it can be cold on some days but as soon as you come up out of the fog it is warm again. It's kind of like standing in front of a refrigerator on a hot summer day. I've never seen anything quite like it anywhere I've fished.

      Delete
  4. Mark
    The Pheasant Tail beadhead has to be my favorite of all the nymphs I fish. I fish it in a number of sizes. The size 12 seems to work best when condition are really slow. What size PT were you using? Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill - you can fish a pheasant tail in a range of sizes at different times of the year. I like fishing a #16, and it will take fish from spring through fall since it is a good mimic for olive or sulfur nymphs. I even tie it in size #10-12 with a pink hot spot and a heavy tungsten bead as an anchor fly (eagan's frenchie).

      Delete
  5. I've never fished the Farmington but your description of the tailwater here (with fog and cold water) reminds me of fishing Arkansas' White. It can be wickedly cold but fun.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Walt - I didn't take the water temp but I don't think it was above 50F. I usually bring some Underarmor Coldgear to put on underneath my clothes but didn't bother this time. I won't forget next time!

      Delete