Monday, June 15, 2015

Back in the Adirondacks

Lots of water coming down over the Canadian shield
The morning was a cool and clear and it was good to be back in the Adirondacks mountains again.  Strong thunderstorms the previous night had removed any traces of humidity from the air.  I knew the streams were going to be running strong so I headed toward one that I knew would be clear.

The rocks in this area are classic examples of Canadian shield geology and the stream is normally crystal clear.  As I approached, I could hear that stream long before it was in view and I knew I would have to find some soft pockets out of the thundering current to drift my flies.

Hemlocks and boulders, a classic Adirondack combination
I choose a Royal Wulff dry with a bead head caddis pupa trailed off the back in case the current was too strong for dries to be productive.   The wet rocks made navigating the stream a bit tricky but I was able to stay dry for most of the couple hours I had to explore.  Each fly was equally effective and a handful of handsome Adirondack brook trout were brought to hand.  It was great to fish some classic Adirondack water again after a long winter.

The amazing beautiful fish that call these waters home

13 comments:

  1. Mark
    Gorgeous stream; are you getting the takes in the super fast water or in the pockets below? Have you landed trout in the fast water and if so what was the pattern? The reason I am asking is I fish fast water sometimes on our tailrace, not as fast as you are showing in the images in your post, but fast enough for me to experiment with. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - no takers in the white water, it's just too swift but there will often be a seam just off the main current and the fish will hang out there or maybe just along side of a plunge. If you look closely at the second picture you will see some softer water just to the left of the white water. Several fish were taken in this water all the way up to the 4 big rocks on the left. Fish took the Royal Wulff and the caddis pupa.

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  2. Awesome trip, Mark! I have been wanting to fish the Adirondacks, and it looks like this summer I may finally have to make the trip up there. Those streams are gorgeous! I'm glad the strong flows weren't too much of a problem, and that caddis pupa produced again! Great shot of that stunning brookie still in the water.

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    1. RI brook trout - The Adriondacks are very unique in a lot of ways. Parts of the Park are still very wild and seldom traveled. I've been try to take more photos of fish in the water and that one came out very nicely.

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  3. Nice outing, Mark. Makes me want to get back into an Adirondack groove.

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    1. Walt - its been a long winter up there, certainly nice to see life return to the Mountains

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  4. Wow, what a beautiful little stream that is. I'm looking forward to getting up to the high peaks area this weekend and definitely planning on casting my line! Try some ausable uglies when the water is high like that... tie them smaller in size 14 if you're so inclined. ;) Toss them right into the hard rushing water, especially the plunges. Don't worry the fish will see them and take them anyway!

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    1. Any time. I'm sure you hardly need it, but it always seems to work for me up there. Those flies were designed by an Adirondack guide for this kind of water for sure! I always love reading your posts and seeing the wonderful places you fish.

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  6. Stunning little stream, lets hope it remains so pristine. Don't forget to visit mine sometime Mark?

    Regards.

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    1. The Adirondacks have a long and rich history of land abuse from the late 19th century but the brook trout have managed to hold on in pockets and there are many who are trying very hard make sure they are there for a long time to come.

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