Sunday, July 19, 2015

A cold tailwater on a hot day

Even though the day was a warm one in the middle of July, but here in CT we are fortunate to have a cold tail water fishery close to home.  I spent the afternoon nymphing an off-the-beaten-path location. Among the handful of browns and a rainbow was a handsome stream born brown.  Caddis pupa was the fly of choice. 



A stream born brown

A hefty rainbow in the mix
Late afternoon, I decided to try and find a place where there might be some fish taking dries.  After checking out a couple potential spots, I settled in for the evening.  Early in the evening there were fish taking small sulfur emergers.  I caught a mix of browns and another rainbow on the #18 sulfur comparadun but there were a number of refusals leading me to think that the fish were actually taking something smaller.

After some early evening action, everything got quite with only an occasional rise here and there.  As soon as darkness started to settle in things picked up significantly.  In the remaining light I was able to take a couple fish on a #20 rusty spinnner.  The fish continued to take spinners well into the darkness.  At this point I could barely see so I was fishing slightly downstream trying to feel the takes before a nice fish broke off the 5x and I called it a night.

6 comments:

  1. Mark
    I need to try some of those patterns on our tailrace here, this past Tuesday was not a good day for me on the Sipsey. The trout refused everything I threw at them. Those are some really quality trout, were the trout feeding subsurface on actually on top most to the time? Thanks for sharing---P.S. check out my upcoming post Wednesday and it will explain what happen

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    1. Bill - I rarely since fish rising during the afternoon hours on the Farmington mostly because there isn't much bug activity at that time of the day so I usually just tight line nypmh the faster water until late afternoon/early evening. Once the bug activity gets going then fish will rise which was the case. First they were on small sulfurs then it switched to rusty spinners late (all on the surface)

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  2. That Farmy cold water has got to be refreshing.
    Nice rainbow.

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    1. Alan - it sure it, the only place I know where you can actually get cold feet on a 90 degree day!

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  3. The W. Branch Delaware is another place where you can get cold feet on a 90 degree day... It's fun casting spinners at dusk until you can't see them anymore... I like your trout photos, the way the trout are not completely removed from the river.

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  4. Walt - Thanks. I've never fished the Delaware but I don't doubt that it's cold as well. I've been trying to take pictures with the fish in the water this year or if I do take them out, it's only for a second or two (as in the picture with the wild brown to show the color better)

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