Monday, July 6, 2015

Two CT fly fisherman team up in search of Adirondack Brook Trout

Lots of water coming down out of the mountains
Friday afternoon Todd and I finally met up to fish an Adirondack brook together.  We have both fished this particular brook and exchanged information over the past couple years but we have not been able to find a time we could both fish together.

The hike in was pleasant and a great time to catch up and exchange some information.  My first look at the brook was encouraging.  My exploring earlier in the week had indicated that the area streams were very high from all the recent rain the Adirondacks have had so far this summer   After dropping in off the trail, the first pool we came to was a lot higher than I have ever seen it, meaning we would have to adapt our approach.

One of my favorite slides
 There was a rush of water coming down my favorite slide that pretty much blew out the entire pool.  After trying some of the soft spots as well the next pool up, we decided that we should move downstream and probe the edges.  Todd worked one side and I the other.

One of the dark brook trout that inhabit these tannin stained waters

Todd working the opposite bank

We were both able to coax some brook trout to take a Royal Wulff even in the high, tannin stained water as we quickly moved along the edges of the brook, attempting to cover lots of ground.  As our time was running out, I wanted to hit particular pool before calling it quits, since it has given up some decent fish over the years.  I pointed the spot out to Todd and after patiently working over a couple likely areas he eventually had a nice bend in his rod and I knew that he had decent fish on.  After a final picture we ended our afternoon together on a high note and hiked back to the car.

The best fish of the day!

8 comments:

  1. Some nice looking water there, Mark. Glad you're finding some mountain time. The streams should be calming down pretty soon.

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    1. Thanks Walt! Curious if you are getting this water too on the western side of the state

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  2. Glad you were able to get a few on dries despite the high water. After all that is the coolest way to catch em! Too bad we have the opposite problem down here with summer and low water starting to set in. Looks like I will be making some mountain trips! One comment on those brookies: I know every brookie population looks different (which is why each one is so special), but those brook trout have a totally different look to them than I've ever seen before on any brookies caught in new england. That last one had an interesting golden color.

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    1. Meant to say north east. NY isn't in new england haha!

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    2. RI brook trout. I will post some pictures in a few days of some brook trout from two other streams in the area. The brook trouit from each stream are quite different in appearance. One stream is crystal clear with a canadian shield geology and the brookies there are light in color while those from the tannin stained streams are darker like the ones above. The brook trout above is fairly typical of trout from this particular stream. At some times of the year they will even show a cherry red belly! So season, water chemistry, and geology seems to effect the coloration.

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  3. Mark
    Gorgeous brook trout, were all trout taken on dries? I think I would revisit that stream after it reaches normal flow. Look forward to the report. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill thanks - yes all the trout were taken on a Royal Wulff this day.

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