Monday, September 7, 2015

The last days of summer

Shorter days, hot, dry, dusty days giving way to golden orange sunsets, astors, golden rod, touches of red and yellow on the mountains, these are the sign posts that summer is coming to an end.

New York Astor
The last days of summer often take small mountain brooks down to their very bones.  Once vibrant streams falling out of the mountains crashing over every rock and boulder in their way are now reduced boulder fields and an endless series of tiny little puddles perfectly reflecting the forest and sky with unbroken calm. 


Somehow  the brook trout find a tiny pocket here or there to survive this yearly cycle.  The fall rains will eventually come, and then the spawn but for now there is the waiting.



10 comments:

  1. It is truly amazing how they hang on through this time....even though it seems like this summer went by in the blink of an eye.

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    1. Chris - amazing creatures for sure!

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  2. It is so amazing they make it isn't it? Every year, it amazes me. It's as if the little trout become amphibians and survive in the mud! Survivors for sure!

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    1. Will - I've seen trout up under rocks along the bank, makes you wonder how much water is really under there but they survive!

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  3. I was out this morning checking some streams and while some had decent flows the temps were to high to float a fly.
    Rain is coming though.

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    1. Alan - I guess I'm not surprised by the warm temps but I am surprised that there are small streams with a decent flow after such a long period without rain.

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  4. Mark
    Love this time of the year, amazing how those brook trout can survive in those little holes of water during dry spells. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - it is amazing how they survive but they do! Fall is still a few weeks away yet, but it is a wonderful time of year

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  5. Their instincts that allow them to seek out cool water through the summer are remarkable and are passed on from generation to generation through genetics, which is what makes each population of brook trout uniquely special. I hope the brook trout in RI are finding some holding spots until the rain comes because I visited my favorite stream the other day only to find it dangerously low. I know the brookies will find a way!

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    1. RI - we are all hoping for some rain this week. It's been a very long time coming!

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