Sunday, December 6, 2015

Simplicity

One of the reasons I love small stream fishing is the simplicity of it.  All you need is a small box of flies, a rod, and a pair of hiking boots.  There is no need for a heavy vest/pack filled with box and boxes of flies and all sorts of other equipment.  I like traveling light. This is one of the reasons I like tight line nypmhing.  No split shot or bobbers, just a handful of weighed flies and some extra tippet for when you break the flies off on the bottom and a pair of forceps and nippers.  So when I saw this article over at Hatches magazine the title caught my eye Winter is coming, 5 flies to get you through it.

As it turns out, I had 4 of them already in my box.  I've not fished a zebra midge before so I decided to tie a couple and give one a try and the last time I was out I caught a brown on one on the first few casts!  So for now there's a place in my box for a few.  I find that this time of year, I catch most of my trout on either a heavy frenchie or a foam egg.

So with a Saturday morning with no pressing concerns and a clear, cold morning on tap, I was up early to get a few things done and then out the door and on my way.  When I checked the river levels in the area of a couple small streams that I wanted to fish they were disappointingly low so the backup plan was to head up to the Farmington River.  The river was a up a bit due to extra release from the dam so I figured it would be a good morning to fish some of the softer water along the edge. I figured the higher flows may have pushed some fish out toward the edge especially early in the morning.

  

When I arrived the sun was up but it was still a little below freezing.  I had the river to myself  except for a flock of Canadian geese.  I will often fish with a couple rods (dry/wet rod, streamer rod, and nymph rod) but today I would strive for simplicity, a single rod and a small box of flies.  

I started working the edge of a gentle riffle and my suspicions were confirmed as I steadily was tight to browns over the next 90min in a couple feet of gently moving water.  Half of the fish took the egg the other half the frenchie.  I finished the day at another spot where a nice rainbow took the frenchie before I called it a morning and returned home enjoying the simplicity of an early morning outdoors.




'Tis the gift to be simple,
'tis the gift to be free,
'Tis the gift to come down where we ought to be...

10 comments:

  1. Congrats on getting out on such a nice day. I'm glad it paid off for you with the nice trout caught. Regards, Sam

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    1. Sam - thanks it was treat to be outside on a chilly morning and have the sun in my face!

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  2. Those are some beautiful trout! Nice job.

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    1. Kiwi - thanks! Hope all is well with you

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  3. Nicely colored browns!! Rainbow looking good too!! It was a gorgeous day!

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    1. Pete - thanks, it was a gorgeous day and I guess I was fortunately to find quite a few willing trout (always a bonus in December)!

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  4. Mark
    It's taken me some time to learn that only a few flies work on any stream, rather than carrying a box full, of some you never use. Beautiful brown on the Farmington--thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - there is beauty and pleasure in simplicity! thanks

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  5. Looks like a great day of fishing! Some gorgeous fish, too. Doesn't it feel good catching fish on a never before used pattern. I love catching fish utilizing different flies.

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