Monday, April 25, 2016

Life and death juxtaposed
Fishing smaller streams is about simplicity, just the essentials, being alert, observant, being alive and present in the moment.  It is good medicine for the soul when life gets complicated.

Walking along the unfamiliar landscape, I felt at times like I was in a valley in the Shenandoah mountains surrounded with mountain laurel and plunge pools.  The water was clear and cold yet full of life and the brook trout slammed the bomber time and time again.  After the quiet gray of winter, the forest is now coming to life as tiny lilies, wood anemone, and wake robin rise up through the decaying leaves  of last fall.



Wood anemone opening to the late morning sun

Wake robin or purple trilium
Later in the afternoon another stream was visited where wild brown and brook trout coexist.  Days like this one are not common, so we savor them with our senses and tuck them away in our memories as days of simplicity, peace, of silence, of life.




12 

Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad:
Let the sea roar, and all it's fullness;
Let the field be joyful, and all that is in it.
Then all the trees of the woods will rejoice before the Lord    Psalm 96:10-11

18 comments:

  1. I can't wait to go up into the higher elevations for brookies this summer. It's been so long since I have caught and released one. Beautiful photos as usual, Alan.

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    1. River Damsel - They are stunning beautiful creatures and yet blend in so well with their surroundings

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  2. Beautiful. I know those fish. I will be visiting them soon, too.

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    1. Thanks Mike - it's the time of year to enjoy fishing small streams

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  3. Looks like it was one of those "perfect" kind of days.

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    1. Kiwi - It was a fantastic day and very much needed

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  4. Beauties for sure the trout and the flora!

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    1. Pete - It is a beautiful time of year in the forest and stream

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  5. Beautiful pictures, Mark. I love having success on unknown waters. Bonus!

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  6. Mark
    Oh, what I would give to have those steams here to fish, but the climate won't allow it; post like this can get me really close to the area. thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - we are very fortunate to have this type of water so close. Your comments remind us to be thankful for all the opportunities we enjoy here in the Northeast

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  7. Beautiful post, Mark. It has a sort of poetic nature to it which I love. Cool looking stream!

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    1. RI brook trout - thanks for noticing! I was shooting for something more than a strictly factual post.

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  8. Excellence as usual Mark. Those fish are beautiful. I had the pleasure of catching some brookies from Rocky Mt. Nat Park last year. That was a first for me in many years. Thanks for sharing those.

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    1. Thanks Howard, spring days and all is alive again!

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  9. Mark great post.
    Life is good.

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