Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Adirondack Spring

Nothing say "spring is here" like bluets
When most of the northeast is in full flower, spring in the Adirondacks is just starting.  Visiting this time of year is  like turning the clock back and getting a second opportunity to enjoy spring.  The bluets are blooming in every open area announcing that spring has come to the Adirondacks.  

I had the opportunity to fish on a recent afternoon.  There were thunder showers in the area but I thought I might be able to sneak in a short outing.   It wasn’t long before the sky was darkening and the rumbles were getting closure.  I threw on my rain jacket and put the camera away in my waterproof bag moments before heavens opened up.  That waterproof bag has come in handy a couple times this spring!  There really wasn’t much hope of staying dry but I waited it out.  

Beavers at work
The storm eventually moved on but the brook I had started to fish was no longer in fish-able condition so I moved to another stream in another valley.  As is often the case weather in one valley may be completely different then in another and this particular stream had no signs of any rain.  In fact, this stream looked more like it does in late July with very little water in it!  I did find a brook trout willing to pounce on a Royal Wulff but the local mosquito population was having me for dinner so I didn’t stay very long.




The next morning, I headed back to stream I fished the afternoon before and it was in great shape after the refreshing rain.  The brook trout were eager to pounce on the first dry I offered.  I started with an elk hair caddis and never changed the fly.  I enjoyed a morning of fishing and photographing some wildflowers, some of which I noticed for the very first time.
  





Pink Lady Slipper sometimes called  moccasin flower


Foam flower
Wild Columbine, this is the first time I've seen these in the woods 

11 comments:

  1. Mark, their is probably a first time for every adventure you go on,that's what makes every trip great,the anticipation of what we will expierence and see. The wild columbine is the first I have ever seen. Thankyou

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    1. Brad - You are probably right, I am often amazed at what I see when I am out fishing. I remember when I was young listening to my grandpaw tell some amazing stories. Everyone in the family dismissed them as "fisherman's tales" but I'm more inclined to think they were "mostly" true.

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  2. Hey Mark, thanks for this post. I was starting to get depressed after reading about everyone's problems with rain, weather and crappy fishing.

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    1. My pleasure Howard! Glad to hear people enjoy the posts

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  3. Looks like a super trip Mark. You have hit some amazing water in the past 6 months! Thanks for sharing it with "us"!
    Will

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    1. Will - yes I have had an amazing couple of weeks and for that I am very thankful!

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  4. Beautiful pictures and descriptions, Mark. I always love seeing pictures of the beautiful brook trout.

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    1. Sam - thanks, I enjoy photographing as much as catching them. Their coloration and markings are so stunning and beautiful. I like to say that they show off God's palate like nothing else I know!

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    2. Could not agree more, Mark. Well said.

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  5. Beautiful wild brook trout and wild flowers Mark !! Very Nice!!

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    1. Thanks Pete! It is a beautiful time of year when everything is alive again!

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