Sunday, September 11, 2016

Some exploring in the Adirondacks

This past week, my wife and I took some time off to enjoy a quite week in the Adirondacks.  I was looking forward exploring a wilderness area that I haven't had the opportunity to spend much time in.

Moose tracks
Early in the week, we headed up an unmarked trail into a gorge with a brook running through it.  I was curious if it held any brook trout.  As we drove into the area we spotted a large bull moose crossing the road.  He was across the road and through the underbrush and gone in just a few long strides.  The land speed of this massive creature was truly impressive.  Unfortunately, there wasn't enough time to grab the camera and get off a quick shot. He had quite a rack on him that I estimated at 6 ft across. On the hike it we saw lots of moose tracks in the softer ground.

A small cave in the gorge
As we hiked up into the gorge, I was  encouraged to see a good flow of water despite the generally dry conditions in the mountains.  Later in the week I visited a favorite mountain brook and was disappointed to see it too low to even fish. When we reached a nice looking plunge pool, I put my rod together and did a little prospecting with a Royal Wulff and a nymph dropper.  After a few drifts through the pool, the dry went under and I was soon holding a beautiful brook trout in my hands. Some smaller brook trout attacked the dry and the nymph before I packed up the rod knowing that the brook was promising lead for further future exploration.

Just what I was looking for
        Later in the week, we hiked up to a trout pond to have a look.  The dry conditions of this past summer had encouraged a good deal of weed growth in the more shallow parts of the pond but it was a pretty little pond that we enjoyed spending a little time resting by.



14 comments:

  1. It has been a tough summer for the brook trout we love. You got a survivor there and hopefully he and others get enough rain this fall to continue the lineage of those like him.

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    1. Sam - it has been a tough summer but I was able to find a few brooks with a decent flow and cool water enough to fish. From what I saw at that one pool this new brook looks like it might be good one.

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  2. Always a great a place to be.....nice post.

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    1. Kiwi - it was a great few days. I will put up another post or two of with some more adirondack pictures that you should enjoy...stay tuned (I am still processing a ton of pictures)

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  3. I have not fished that area yet. It's on the top of my list for my third annual wild brook trout trip.

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    1. Rowan - if you like wild places, it is a place that you would enjoy. Most people don't realize that the Adirondacks are distinct from the rest of the Appalachian mountains. It's a huge park and the regions each have a different character but definitely worth some exploration.

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  4. So that's where you've been. Nice brookie considering this summer's weather.
    Did you explore the cave?

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    1. Alan - yes, I've been MIA lately! Between getting Lydia off to college and then a week away it's seems like I've been gone for a while! Things should be getting back to normal now. I didn't explore the cave, it looked like a small opening but at the time we were more interested in finding some waterfalls which we did. More pictures to come

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  5. Keep posting more pictures Mark, I've never been anywhere near the Adirondacks and it sure looks nice.

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    1. Howard - thanks, I will. Check out my facebook page for more landscapes etc

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  6. Mark I have never been to the Adirondacks , are moose common to see? I have always read that brook trout were hit or miss due to acidic issues with the water. It's nice to see you found some. It's looks like a true wilderness area. Thanks for the trip.

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  7. Brad - Moose are making a strong come back in the Adirondacks. Ten years ago it was rare to see one but now in the bigger wilderness areas there are a lot more. The one I saw was a very healthy large bull moose and the very first I've seen in the Adirondacks. While we were hiking, I saw a ton of moose tracks so there are probably a decent number in that area. Since the Adirondacks are boggy in spots it is an ideal habitat for them. Like the moose, the brook trout are also making a come back in some of the ponds now that SO2 levels are being controlled in the midwest. There are several ponds that have isolated "heritage" strain brook trout that have survived these strains are being used to re-populate surrounding ponds now that the pH in the ponds is rising to healthy levels. The biggest challenge is the $ to do what's needed.

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  8. Mark - What areas of the Adirondacks do you usually visit? I live in the far north portion and spend most of my time is search of brookie waters. If you ever make it to the northern Adirondacks I could show you some fun little brooks.

    Best, Tim

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    1. Tim - thank you very much. I spend most of the time in the south/central region

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