Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Tale of two brooks

Wood aster dominate the September
landscape
I had been wanting to fish a favorite mountain brook all summer but the heat and dry weather had reduced it to barely a trickle for most of the summer but with hopeful optimism, I assembled my fiberglass rod, put a small fly box and some odds and ends in my pockets, slung my camera over my shoulder and headed up the trail along the ridge line of a deep valley.  I listened intently for the sound of running water but the forest was silent.  After a steep descent into the valley I realized just how dry this little stream had become.  Depressions that were once a couple feet deep and provided refuge to the brook trout were now mostly exposed. Knowing this brook pretty well, I could estimate that the water level was more than 2 feet below typical summer levels.  A couple small brook trout did attack my Royal Wulff but I just didn't want to fish the brook under these conditions so I hiked back up the valley and back to the car.


While the first stream was disappointingly low, I did have a plan B in mind.  Arriving at a second brook, I could see that the water was low but still cold and there were still pockets of deeper water for the fish to take refuge in.   Even though I brought along a small fly box, I really only need one fly for the couple hours I fished, a #16 foam ant.  Anywhere there was a little depth and some moving water there was usually a brook trout waiting to pounce on the ant.   It was so nice to fish a small stream once again after a very dry summer. 





4 comments:

  1. Mark, nice to see you found some cool water and brookies still surviving!

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    1. Pete - I was nice to fish a small stream again. It was low but it was still cold and this stream has some deep pockets where the fish can hold.

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  2. Always encouraging, Mark, to see the brook trout thriving despite the lack of rain. they are tough customers. Thanks as always for the beautiful pictures. Pray for rain. Regards, Sam

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    1. Sam - they manage to survive year after year! It's part of why we find them so fascinating!

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