Monday, December 5, 2016

Dry flies in December

Sun and Shadows on a December afternoon in brook trout forest

An afternoon outing in brook trout forest started out in sun but it wasn't long before the afternoon shadows covered much of the stream.  By the time I was back at the car the temperatures had dropped into the upper 30's.  All the leaves are down now and some rain this past week helped to clear some of the leaf debris from the stream.  I can't think of a better way to spend a December afternoon than outside walking in the woods.





I've had this little personal challenge going to trying to catch trout in every month of the year on a dry.  There are definitely more productive ways to fish in the winter but I just enjoy fishing dries whenever I can.  On this cool December afternoon it wasn't long before I found a few brook trout willing to take a small elk hair caddis off the surface.




A couple of small stream gems
Mission accomplished!

22 comments:

  1. Mark
    Give me the dry over the nymph any day, glad it brought you success. Just curious what are the coldest temps you've fished there? Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill. I've fished below freezing but I don't honestly remember the coldest. We have had some cold New Year's Day outings

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  2. Congrats on keeping the streak alive!!!I know we had a couple in the mid twenties on NYD.

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    1. Pete - thanks, yes I remember of couple of very cold days but I couldn't remember how cold they were.

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  3. This year sure made it easy on us year round dry fly guys!

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    1. Rowan - oddly enough in March of this year, a streak I had going for a couple years ended, so I am starting again. For me the toughest months are February and March

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  4. You can't go wrong with a little Elk Hair Caddis. Well done Mark.

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    1. Howard - agreed, that's why it's one of my fantastic four (elk hair caddis, Ausable Bomber, parachute Adams, and a Royal Wulff). The other half of my box is not even needed most of the time.

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  5. Mark, you had a few wonderful hours in "brook trout forest" that's such a pretty stream.
    Nicely done.

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    1. Alan - I did have a wonderful couple of hours to rest the mind and enjoy the beauty that so many don't even notice

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  6. Mark, glad to see you got out. The elk hair caddis is my number 1 dry fly,bar none. Most people only fish it as a dry, but their are many possibilities,my favorite is to swing it at the end of a tail out,the strikes can be quite amazing at times. Beautiful little gems you have their. It's nice you challenge yourself with drys this time of year. Thankyou.

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    1. Brad - thanks. When I am fishing the elk hair caddis this time of year, I'm not really drifting it as a typical dry but tugging and drifting it in short pulses. This seems to draw attention where a typical drift will not. Sometimes I'm even fishing it like a mini streamer. Being able to fish is so many different ways is what makes the elk hair caddis such a versatile fly!

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  7. Indeed, Mark, mission accomplished!! Kudos to you for having the vision and accepting the challenge of fishing Dry Fly's throughout the year. The Elk Hair Caddis in all of it's various recipe's is a great little fly..........

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    1. Mel - thanks. I will fish wets and heavier flies in the winter but I do like to atleast try a dry.

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  8. Whether on dry flies or wets, December brook trout are always good to see. Nice job there, Mark.

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    1. Walt - agreed. I guess the dry vs wet thing is mostly semantics since the dries I fish in the winter months are fished like wets or small streamers in the film

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  9. Way to go, Mark! Though a tough and dry summer, those beauties survived to carry on their kind. Beautiful as always, the brook trout.

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    1. Sam - it was a very dry summer but there have been many since Brook trout first inhabited tiny headwater streams. They are survivors and the fact encourages those of us who are captivated by them but that still requires us to advocate for their preservation

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  10. Hi Mark I was curious if you sold flies?

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    1. Jim - No I don't. I will tie a few for friends but I tied too slow to do it commercially.

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