Monday, February 27, 2017

Run-off

It's no secret that the weather here in the northeast has been warm with rain and even a few thunderstorms. All this warmth and rain can mean only one thing up in the mountains, run-off.  It is really an awesome sight to see when a large volume of water is coming down the mountains.  In summer these high gradient streams are beautiful and refreshing but in spring they can be angry and a bit terrifying.

Here are a pair of pictures of the same run, one in summer and one taken this past weekend. The angles are different so it's a bit difficult to see that they are in fact the same run.  It is amazing to me that anything can survive the spring run-off in these mountain streams.  What the second picture can't do is convey the deafening sound of the water coming down the mountains.




16 comments:

  1. Mark
    I would suspect all that water brings new trout to the stream with each flood. thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill - This is the normal cycle of mountain streams. There are seams and pockets that the fish tend to hunker down into during the run off I suppose.

      Delete
  2. It'll be good to have a strong spring run-off after the lack of any kind last year. As long as it isn't enough to scour the bottom and wash the insect out as has happened in Western PA the last few year, I love to see that high brawling water!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rowan - the run-off is one of the reasons these streams are not particular fertile in terms of insect life but the brook trout survive year after year.

      Delete
  3. Really nice photos, Mark! Good to see so much water in your area this year. Hope all bodes well for the fish and other habitat as the water recedes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel - thanks. Hopefully the rains and snow melt will replenish the streams and reservoirs that were dangerous low last fall.

      Delete
  4. Very cool to see the seasonal differences on streams - it is absolutely unreal that fish and other creatures survive the extremes of our small streams!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will - it was pretty impressive display of nature's power!

      Delete
  5. Wow! What a difference. I'd like to see what the Spring run off looks like.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard - seeing is only half the story! I once took one of my daughters hiking up one of these streams and the sound was so intense that it was upsetting her so much we had to leave

      Delete
  6. Mark, it has always amazed me how trout find a place to hole up during heavy run offs and floods. They find a way somehow to survive.

    Regards, Sam

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wild trout are tough when it comes to heavy run-off. What's more debilitating to them and to the young and the insect life is the succession of extreme conditions such as drought and flood. Thanks, and hope you have some good angling opportunities soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Walt - Thanks for an insightful comment! These mountain streams do have some wide extremes in flow throughout the year. One another local stream, I once caught a handful of rainbows one season a couple miles up into the mountains from a stream stocked by NYS. I've always wondered if the runoff allowed the fish to move upstream because I can't see how they could have made it that far upstream under more normal flows.

      Delete
    2. ^^This. I've had the same thought. The movement of fish is fascinating. Some of it seems impossible.

      Delete