Thursday, February 9, 2017

Silver Doctor


I really love classic Bergman style wet flies so when my friend Mike told me he had been fishing a small stream using a silver doctor, I decided to try tying a few.  I've done a couple married wing wet flies before but the silver doctor that I wanted to tie was going to be the most complex wing I have constructed.  With some coaching from my other friend Ben, I managed to get some wing sections that looked ok so today I tied up some bodies and mounted the wing on half a dozen.  My plan is to actually fish these so I wanted to have a few on hand.

Staging
There are a lot of variations of the silver doctor out there so I looked at quite a few before deciding on a combination of materials that I thought preserved the look of the classic salmon fly but in a Bergman style wet fly.  For this variation I used a wing of red, yellow, blue, and guinea hen wing sections.  I used a silver tip, red tag, golden pheasant tippet for the tail and silver tinsel with a silver wire rib for the body.  For the hackle I used a section of partridge under some blue saddle hackle and of course red thread for the head. I worked on getting a couple of wing sets together, then tied some bodies and mounted the wings.

16 comments:

  1. As hard as I try I cannot make consistently decent married wings. Yours looks excellent!

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    1. Rowan. It takes a lot of practice! I made wings for about a month before I could make a few decent sets and then there was the challenge of getting them mounted without destroying them in the process. As with most things patience and persistence reap reward. Keep at it you will figure it out

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  2. Mark
    Excellent job at the vice; would look good under class as well as fishing it. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thanks Bill I appreciate your comment. I told myself that I would tie these for fishing so that's what I will do. I'm pretty sure those wings will get beat up but I would be willing to bet the fish won't care

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  3. I would take that first Silver Doctor and frame it. I'd never be able to duplicate it...beautiful.

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    1. Howard - thanks for the kind words. It turned out pretty well but it's a long way from framing quality!

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  4. Well, Mark my BlogBuddy, I am going to have to disagree with you on this. That Silver Doctor is framing quality in my mind and would look good on anyone's den wall to show the pride of fly tying history..........

    Great work!

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    1. Thank you very much Mel your kind words are appreciated

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  5. I like your chances with that fly, Mark! Just beautiful.

    Regards, Sam

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  6. That's a fine looking Doctor there, Mark. When I was a kid, someone gave me a Silver Doctor dry fly and it opened a door to a life-long fascination with flies. I never fished that artificial, just gave it a slot of honor in a fly box somewhere. I've occasionally tried to fish the pattern with other ties but haven't had much luck with it. I suppose it takes an Atlantic salmon. Anyway, I'll bet your copies will do the trick somewhere.

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    1. Walt - thanks. I figure with all those colors a brook trout in the spring should take a liking to it.

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  7. Mark, the one medium of tying I admire the most is marrying different winging material together, I have never attempted it,someday I will. The silver doctor is a great classic. I think you really did a nice job on that fly. I will love to see your results from using it. Good to hear from you again, hope your enjoying your remodel.

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    1. Brad - thanks. Marrying wings took me a good deal of practice. I found that marrying larger slips together and then dividing them with a bodkin made life a lot easier! I am kind of curious how it fishes. We've got a functioning kitchen again but the painting is still waiting for me!

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