Wednesday, September 27, 2017

September in the Adriondacks

Signs of fall are all around
A couple weeks ago we had the chance to spend a couple days up in the Adirondacks.  The mountains were starting to show signs of the approaching fall and despite the wet spring and summer this past fall has been reasonably dry in the mountains.

The mountains are especially quiet and beautiful in September which seems to heighten the sense of remoteness that one feels in the less traveled parts of the Adirondack Park.  The families that vacation in the mountains in the summer are back to their regular routines and those who like to observe the fall foliage are still planning their travels.  My wife and I enjoyed some fantastic weather for hiking and I fished a familiar small stream and did a little prospecting on a new stream.

So clear that you can see the High Peaks in the distance (looking NE)
A typically colored brook trout from a tanin-stained
Adirondack brook
I have always wondered whether a particular small stream held brook trout but finally got a chance check it out. The stream had a nice flow of tanin-stained water with some deeper runs and pools that looked very promising.  I found one deep, long pool with a nice flow of water at the head which probably would hold fish in the spring but on a clear September day the fish were likely tucked under a bank somewhere.  I didn't spend a long time exploring but after drifting the Royal Wulff through a couple of promising areas, I did confirm that the stream is worth exploring further.  It is always nice to see another stream where these native fish are still holding strong.

Adirondack Reflections

The next day, I fished a familiar stream and found fish willing to chase a foam ant, Royal Wulff, or Ausable Bomber.  The fly didn't really matter much.  The fish seemed to be hiding under the rocks along the banks.  Most of the brook trout that were willing to show themselves were of the smaller variety but I did see more than a  few dark shadows scurrying for cover in the low, clear water of early fall.  It was fun to watch the brook trout dart from under a rock or bank to intercept a fly working it's way along the current.


Even though our visit was brief I was so thankful to have the opportunity to enjoy the mountains at this wonderful time of year.  Our final day in the mountains we decided to hike early and enjoy the view below before heading home.


10 comments:

  1. Beautiful pictures, Mark. I am glad you got to fish along with enjoying the peace and quiet with your wife while hiking that beautiful area. It is good to see the brook trout still making a living in those small streams.

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    1. Sam - thanks, we love the mountains and yes the brook trout are still hanging on!

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  2. Does my heart good to see brookies in Adirondack small streams. The time I spent up there as a youth was during the worst of the Acid Rain years. Seeing barren bodies of water made a big impact on me as a young angler. Good to see humans change their ways for the benefit of nature.

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    1. AT - Nice hearing from you! The Adirondacks are actually quietly making a comeback. The pH in many ponds are returning to historical levels and surviving "heritage" strains are being re-introduced. It's likely that the state record brook trout (>5lbs) was a re-introduced heritage strain brook trout.

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  3. Mark
    Must be nice to get out there and enjoy nature and get away to enjoy some peaceful time. Nice parr marks on that last pic of the brook trout.

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    1. Pete - It was very nice. Adirondack brook trout can be (not always) some of the most colorful you will ever see!

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  4. Thanks for the post....I have been missing the Adirondacks.

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    1. Kiwi - Nice hearing from you also! We didn't get up that much this year so it was nice to have a few early fall days up there.

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  5. Hey buddy that brook trout at the bottom of your post should be in "Trout" magazine.....

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    1. Alan - thanks! Adirondack brook trout can be quite stunning!

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