Monday, October 30, 2017

Wild ones

A tiny tributary in healthy shape after
some recent rain
One of the many joys of small stream fishing is the fact that most fish in these small streams are wild fish.  While small headwater streams don’t hold large fish, the ability to observe the stunning beauty of these wild fish is the reason some of us are drawn to this endeavor.   This is especially true in the fall when the brook and brown trout begin to take on their characteristic pre-spawn coloration and the New England woodlands echos these changes with the distinctive yellows, oranges and reds of a hardwood forest in seasonal transition.

Recent rains were reminding me of the simple pleasure of small stream fishing in the fall and had me looking for an opportunity to get out again.  Visiting a favorite small stream, I was pleased to see that it was full and flowing at a level that reminded me more of spring than fall and I wondered if fishing a dry fly was the right choice.  Despite my doubts, I was content to fish a dry fly all morning long along the riffles and glides.  Several small yearling brook trout were interested in the elk hair caddis but nothing larger.

Approaching a stump along the stream's edge, I drifted the dry in a small seam just alongside the stump's edge and saw a nice brook trout rise to inspect the fly.  I generally don't see small stream brook trout refuse a fly, so I tried again trying to get more natural drift and again the fish rose, put's it's nose right under the fly, and then descended, disappearing once again into the cover that the stream bottom provided.  At this point I was convinced that a fly change was in order.  Looking through my box, I pulled out a small parachute Adams that I often fish in the fall and drifted it through the same seam.  The first drift failed to produce a response but the second brought the trout up from it's hiding spot and it took the Adams. After a brief battle, I was soon admiring the bright orange belly and dark throat of a gorgeous native brook trout.  

  
I continued to fish the Adams and found a few willing to take the dry fly, most however were willing to only take a swipe or two.  In the last run fished this particular morning, I also found a beautiful little wild brown.  I rarely find a wild brown as far upstream as I was, but it was a very fitting end to a fall morning out chasing wild trout and enjoying all the sights, sounds, and smells of a fall morning in New England. 


16 comments:

  1. Mar
    Gorgeous colors on the brookie and brown. It is that time of the year for them!

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  2. The stream looks familiar and looks to be in wonderful condition.
    That brookie is in his finest dress.

    Nicely done.

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    1. Alan - you know it well my friend! After the rains last week the water was up to spring levels. I thought about using a bead head nymph but stuck with the dry.

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  3. Mark
    This post is another reminder why you and Alan are so blessed as fly fishermen!!! Sorry I've missed some of your post but moving again is taking a lot of my time now---thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - hope your move goes well. We are looking at move next fall ourselves (my job is moving to Cambridge,MA).

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  4. Beautiful wild trout, Mark. What a joy to see the beauties that live in that small stream.

    Best, Sam

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    1. Thanks Sam! It was so nice to be out on a small stream again!

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  5. Mark, it's amazing what a little water can do to stir up a fishery. That brown is beautiful, wonderful markings. I love fishing stream that have both wild Browns and brooks, doesn't happen to much down my way. I know the recent rain was a welcome site in pa. Thanks .

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    1. Brad - thanks! Wild browns can be stunning too. I think Alan has run into some wild tigers (brook/brown hybrid) somewhere along where this stream joins other tribs. I bet the Yellow Breeches is fishing well after the rain!

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  6. The recent rains were a welcome event for the small stream fishing in our area, as you witnessed with the catch of pretty brooks and browns. Although conditions are changing rapidly, I think we were lucky to have enjoyed a beautiful autumn this year.

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    1. Walt - It was a fine autumn for sure. With the colder weather we are now having it's making me wish that I had gotten out more

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  7. Just read your article. Good one. I liked it. Keep going. you are a best writer your site is very useful and informative thanks for sharing!
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  8. Mark
    Gorgeous colors on both trout; the trout will always tells us what interest them. I know sometimes I try to make the trout hit what I want them to take, but I've learn the trout know best. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thanks Bill - hope the move is progressing ok

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