Thursday, December 14, 2017

One last trip to PA

A small wild brown
Tuesday was my last opportunity to fish in PA in 2017.  It’s been fun fishing the Yellow Breeches this past spring and fall. 
The Yellow Breeches isn’t a true spring creek but rather a hybrid between a classic PA limestone stream and a freestone stream.  Nevertheless it is a bit different from the New England freestone streams I’m familiar and has offered me a chance to broaden my fly fishing experience.  I’ve had a lot of help learning this stream from the local TCO shop in Boiling Springs, Brad Bashore and other PA fly fishermen I’ve met while fishing Yellow Breeches.  Fishing “the run” in Boiling Springs has certainly pushed me to become more proficient at fishing small flies.  

I fished tiny tungsten bead head nymphs (#18 and #20) under a small indicator using my 6’6” fiberglass rod with a short furled leader and about 3 feet of 5X fluorocarbon tippet.  This system seemed to work well and was a big improvement over the tight line rigs I had been messing with on my previous visits.  The first brown in the net took a small rainbow warrior in a gentle riffle with a little depth to it.  I continued to fish this run and had another take the small red zebra midge but I didn’t get a solid hook set. While fishing I struck up a conversation with a very friendly older gentlemen who was watching me.  I recognized him from my previous visits.  He had fished this area for many years and was full of information.



Encouraged by our conversation, I went up the to run that noticed him fishing on previous visits and briefly connected with a rainbow sitting in front of a rock at the tail of the riffle.  I worked up the riffle and found another rainbow.  Neither fish was holding in water that I would have thought would hold fish in December but in this spring fed section the warmer water must keep the fish a little more active than in a typical freestone in winter.

A pretty rainbow that was sitting in a faster riffle
I finished the afternoon back where I started and stuck with the double nymph rig.  I ended up using a slightly bigger rainbow warrior for the added weight to get the flies down and it seemed to pay off.  I found three little wild browns and a stocked brown that took either the larger rainbow warrior or the red zebra midge.  At this point I decided to play around with a #16 frenchie perdigon .  Many of you may not be familiar with this Spanish style nymph which uses thread and UV resin to create a small, dense fly with the ability to sink fast.  I first saw this pattern on The Flow - Fly Fishing Blog and tied a few variations for those situations where a small fly was needed but one that would sink fast and this seemed like an ideal spot to give it a try.   I was pleased to see that a wild PA brown agreed.  I suggest you check out the link if you want more info on this particular fly.  

That red adipose says "wild"

15 comments:

  1. Mark
    Some very nice trout you have there. Good to see you are taking the opportunity to fish that stream and finding success.

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    1. Thanks Pete - it's been fun and challenging

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  2. Mark, Glad you had some good times catching those attractive Yellow Breechers! The PA trout streams of that area are interesting visits, that's for sure. The fine water and the fly-fishing history in that locale are hard to beat. I'm hoping to revisit these streams (especially the Letort) in February.

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    1. Walt - that area is indeed rich in history. Some day I will make it over to the Letort which I haven't fished yet but I hear it is highly technical fishing! Have a fun in February!

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  3. Another great post!

    The Run was the location of my first trout on a fly. It’s a different place now, but it’s obviously still a special place.

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    1. Casting Across - Nice to hear that area has some "personal" history associated with it for you. I grew up and first started fishing not far from there in southern York county PA

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  4. Mark, glad to see the run was kind to you. I personally have always used the run as my educational grounds. It's where I learned to sight fish. Its where you can learn about how pressured fish react to different flies, different presentations and predators. I'm glad that with each trip some of the pieces of the puzzle are falling into place. Hope you and your family have a wonderful and peaceful Christmas.

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    1. Brad - thanks for all your suggestions and insight on visiting the area. It's been a lot of fun to explore. I can see why "the run" would be a good teacher! Merry Christmas to you and your family as well

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  5. Mark
    Beautiful browns and bows taken; learning new waters can be challenge, thankful for the locals. Hope you and the family have a blessed Christmas! Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - thanks and Merry Christmas to you and your family as well

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  6. Mark,
    Congrats on your success on the Yellow Breeches! It is gratifying to learn a new stream and connect with trout. I am sure that older fellow you met had plenty of useful information. I always enjoy talking to fishermen like him. Merry Christmas to you and your family.
    Best Regards, Sam

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    1. Sam - thanks! I always enjoying talking with others who have a lifetime of experience fishing their local waters. There is always something new to learn. Merry Christmas to you and your family as well

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  7. Just read your article. Good one. I liked it. Keep going. you are a best writer your site is very useful and informative thanks for sharing! Known as the "kayak fisherman's issue," how would you oar and fish while on a kayak? With just two hands, how would you hold your angling pole bar and move your kayak? spinning reels.

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