Friday, July 13, 2018

An Adirondack morning


Last week I had the chance to spend a few days in the Adirondacks.  With temperatures reaching into the upper 90’s in most New England, the Adirondack Mountains did not escape the heat wave as they often do.  The heat coupled with dry summer conditions meant that most of the brooks I usually fish were too low and potentially too warm to fish but there is one that usually remains cold through the dry summer months. 

white compagnon
I was up before dawn to take advantage of the cooler morning air.  The cool night air had brought a heavy dew on the white compagnon, daisies, and chicory growing along the roadsides this time of year.   When I reached the brook, I could hear the gently tumbling water but the stream was low.  A quick check of the water temperature, indicated it was in a safe range to fish.  I fished a black foam ant in the heads of the small plunges and caught a few smaller brook trout.  Switching to a larger tan caddis seemed to bring a few larger fish to the surface.

As I picked my way downstream along the boulder strewn brook, I approached a favorite shelf of exposed Canadian Shield.  Along the shelf there is a break in the rock that forms an underwater ledge with some current running along it.  I often find fish hanging close to the ledge.  As the caddis floated along the ledge, I watched a nice brook trout rise, inspect the fly and turn away.  Most brook trout that I run across in these relatively sterile Adirondack streams don’t typically refuse a well presented fly so this was a bit puzzling.  I waited a bit and then tried again, this time with no response.  Switching to a foam ant, and then lighter colored usual, also failed to interest the trout.  Reasoning that the fish had inspected a tan colored fly, I tied on an Ausuable Bomber and floated it along the ledge.  This time it rose and took the fly but the barbless hook didn’t hold and the brook trout headed back to the safety of the ledge.  Not wanting to give up on nice fish, I waited some more and tried the bomber once again and was surprised that it rose once again.  This time the hook held and I was soon holding a lightly colored Adirondack brook trout.  You can see the exposed Canadian Shield in the background.  I find the fish in this particular stream are generally lighter in color, this may be due to lack of tannin in the water (often found in the Adirondacks) and the lighter stream bed formed by this rock.



I continued to fish until the morning air started to bear the heat of the coming day and then quit.  I would have like to fish more while we in the mountains but the temperature and the dry conditions didn’t allow that but I was thankful for one morning to fish in the mountains we love.

15 comments:

  1. Mark, that's a darn nice brookie for a small stream. Waters are getting a little thin, hopefully nature will turn on the faucet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alan - It was one of the bigger ones I’ve caught in that stream which is why I kept trying. Hopefully the weeks ahead will bring some rain!

      Delete
  2. Mark
    This post proves to keep searching for the fly pattern that will get results. Most of the time it is usually between 3 or 4 flies. Quality brook trout thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Bill. In my experience, brook trout usually aren’t fussy and will take just about any well presented fly so my experience that morning was atypical

      Delete
  3. Mark ,nice to see you could get away. It's funny how one fish can end up being the focus of one trip. I particularly enjoy finally figuring out a particular trout that doesn't want to cooperate. Sometimes I do sometimes I don't. It's part of the game. Nice post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brad - thanks. This one looked like it was a good sized fish and I had hooked a big one on this stream last summer so I was curious if it was the same fish so I didn't want to give up on it.

      Delete
  4. Targeting a specific fish is always more fun than "blind" casting. Could it be he was caught on the "bomber" because that is the pattern you,the angler, have the most confidence in?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John - thanks for the comment. I've got a lot of confidence with caddis, ants, bombers and royals. Who knows why this particular brookie was interested in a bomber; maybe a particular drift line or a larger profile but I would be guessing.

      Delete
  5. What a beautiful brook trout. Good and much needed rain is supposed to hit the northeast tomorrow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sam - thanks, we could all use a little rain around here!

      Delete
  6. Persistence pays off under trying circumstances. Nice catch there, Mark. I was on the Madison River recently when a monstrous rainbow rose to take a #6 Salmonfly imitation but missed. I tried and tried to get that fish to rise again but without success. Can't complain, though, the trip was wonderful. Let's hope for cooler, more fish-friendly, weather to come.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Walt - Most times a fish won't rise again, particular if it's felt the hook but every now and then they do! Too bad you missed that nice rainbow. Looking forward to your report! Hopefully rain last night will have helped some.

      Delete
  7. I think we're all suffering with unbearable heat. Thankfully for the fish and the wildfires we had a really good long soaker today. Well done Mark!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Howard. We had a decent rain here yesterday that should help some. Stay cool!

      Delete
  8. Thanks for the information Mark Wittman.
    your are a good writer i think.
    safariors.com

    ReplyDelete