Sunday, September 23, 2018

Fall is in the air

It's been a hectic and stressful summer around here but the good news its that we have a buyer for our home and managed to find a new home in MA.  The final details are being worked out but the plan is to be our new home in late October.  In the meantime, I hope to be able to fish a few of my favorite places before moving. 

The first brook trout of the morning
When fall rolls around I usually fish a lot of Adams variations so I decided to tied a few Adams in the Wulff style and test them out.  I used some woodchuck guard hairs for the tail, white calf tail for the wings, grey superfine dubbing, and brown and grizzly hackle. 

Yesterday, I took advantage of some fall like weather to fish one of my favorite small streams.  The first test of the adams wulff was along the log pictured above.  As the fly drifted along the last two feet of the log, a nice brook trout aggressively took it and headed back under the log.  I was able to keep it from getting back under the log for a little before it managed to free itself.  It wasn't too long before the wulff connected with another brook trout. Most of the fish caught were showing signs of getting ready to spawn.

As I worked my way along the stream there was a definite sense that fall was in the air.  The day was cool and overcast and the forest was taking on that early fall yellowish glow.  The New York Asters were still evident.  The adams wulff would be all that was needed. 



The best brook trout of the day went completely airborne and took the Wulff on the way down as it drifted through a gentle run!

I don't know if I will get to fish this little stream very much in the future but today I enjoyed walking along it's banks once again during on of my favorite time of year.

12 comments:

  1. Beautiful brook trout you caught, Mark. Congrats on the sale of your home and your next move.

    I mostly fish the Swift River in Massachusetts, and sometimes can't believe how aggressive the brookies are taking insects out of the air. They know how to hunt.

    Best, Sam

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    1. Thanks Sam, we are so glad to have that part of the relocation behind us but it is bittersweet for us. Brook trout are certainly opportunistic feeders and it fun to watch them take a dry fly off the surface!

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  2. That looks awesome Mark! What a super enjoyable day afield. So true Parachute... Occasionally they leap from the water to catch an airborne bug, a lot like a smallmouth bass will leap for a dragon fly! Fun to see!

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    1. Thanks Will! It was so nice to outside again on a small stream at one of my favorite times of year!

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  3. Mark
    First off glad the move is working out for you guys; just curious are you moving farther away from the streams you normally fish there? The airborne trout is something to get the heart pounding for sure. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Thanks Bill - we are moving further away so I'm trying visit a few of my favorite places before we move.

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  4. For sure Mark, I regretted not wearing thermal trousers below my breathable waders yesterday. Stunning pics as always.
    cheers George

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    1. George - It's been a while since I have some long sleeves on. Stay warm!

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  5. I have been noticing that early fall yellowish glow myself on our streams here in TN. Fall is definitely knocking at the door. Looks like a wonderful trip to that brook trout stream!

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    1. Thanks David! I see you and Leah had quite and adventure out west!

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  6. was 92 the other day. Had a few cold snaps but still waiting on that Fall weather. Since we moved, I miss just walking up the hill for trout.

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    1. Josh - far from the 90's here! Where was home before you moved to Arkansas? I'm trying fish a few of the local small streams that I love before we relocate.

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