Monday, October 8, 2018

October days

The signs of fall are everywhere in the woodlands now.  The leaves are turning yellow,  the reds and oranges will soon dominate the landscape.  The lush green ferns of summer have turned golden as if to echo the changes in the canopy above.  The steady rains of late summer have continued and the streams are full and flowing in full strength, adding their voices to the symphony of color that is fall in New England.  Even the air has that distinctive smell of fall.


I was honestly surprised by how full the brook was and wondered whether a dry was going to be effective.  I did have a couple smaller fish slash at the adams/wulff variation I had used previously.  I decided a dry dropper was a better choice so switched to a larger Ausable Bomber with a lighting bug nymph as the dropper, thinking that a bright, olive-type nymph was a good choice for fall.

A lot of trees were down from the summer storms making delivering the pair of flies into various seams and undercuts a bit more challenging then usual but such is small stream fishing.  Sometimes it's all about getting into the right position to guide the flies gently downstream into the right current seam.  Sometimes this involves perching on a rock midstream and using a bow and arrow cast to flip the flies alongside the base of an overhanging tree and with a little patience mending the line you can get the flies to drift right along the base of that tree.

On this particular October day, a fish rose from under that tree and crushed the Bomber.  I saw a red flash and thought I had hooked a small rainbow but after a brief struggle I was holding one of the most gorgeous brook trout I've seen in some time.  The deep orange underside was indicative of a fine male getting ready to spawn.  The colors on this fish was stunning and I was so disappointed that during my fumbling to get my camera ready and keep the fish in the water, it managed to get back under that tree in a flash.

 I continued to fish the dry-dropper for the remaining hours of daylight until dusk began to envelope the forest.  Hiking out in the near darkness, I was thankful for the opportunity to enjoy a day afield in my favorite season of the year.  I hope each of you are able to enjoy these October days as well!

10 comments:

  1. Mark, that stream is a real gem. It's still in great condition, as are the brookies that swim within its waters.

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    1. yes it is Alan! I don't know how often I will get to visit after we move but I was thankful for another day to enjoy it.

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  2. Nice to see that you are back fishing and blogging. Nice read as always.

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    1. Mike - thanks, I am trying to fish a little before the move. Not sure how much I will be able to do after!

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  3. Mark
    What a great way to enjoy fall landing wild brook trout in the beautiful northeast!!! Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill - thanks! It is so beautiful here in New England in the fall!

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  4. Mark, I am glad you got a chance to fish and connected with beautiful fall brook trout. They really are something to behold this time of year.
    Best, Sam

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    1. Sam - thanks, this is a wonderful time of year in the forest!

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  5. Glad you're enjoying the prospects of a new home and also getting out on the streams in this beautiful (high water) season with brook trout on the line.

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    1. Walt - thanks! Actually, I am revisiting a few favorite streams before the move at the end of the month. I am trying to enjoy this wonderful season before the business of the move takes over!

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